Submitted: 15 Apr 2015
Revised: 05 Jun 2015
Accepted: 15 Jun 2015
First published online: 06 Oct 2016
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Int J Enteric Pathog. 2015;3(4): e29009.
doi: 10.17795/ijep29009
  Abstract View: 1172
  PDF Download: 604

Research Article

Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Yersinia Species Isolated From Chicken and Beef Meat

Shadi Aghamohammad 1, Mehrdad Gholami 2, Hossein Dabiri 3,4 * , Ghazal Rahimzadeh 5, Negar Souod 6, Hossein Goudarzi 3, Soheil Sardari 3, Alireza Mohammadzadeh 7

1 Department of Microbiology, Pasteur Institue Of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran
2 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
3 Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
4 Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
5 Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
6 Young Researchers and Elite Club, Islamic Azad University, Central Tehran Branch, Tehran, IR Iran
7 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, IR Iran
*Corresponding author: Hossein Dabiri, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2123872556, Fax: +98-2122432517, Email: hodabiri@gmail.com

Abstract

Background: Foodborne diseases are widespread and growing public health problem in developed and developing countries. There are many microorganisms act as etiological agents for foodborne diseases such as Campylobacter spp., Listeria, Staphylococcos, Salmonella, Bacillus, Yersinia spp. High prevalence of gastrointestinal illness, including fatal cases attributable to yersiniosis, is also observed in many developing countries.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica and other Yersinia species in meat and chicken samples in various seasons and to determine their antibiotic resistance profile.

Materials and Methods: To investigate the prevalence of Yersinia spp., a total of 450 samples, including chicken (n = 226) and beef meat (n = 224) were collected from supermarkets in Tehran. All samples were transported on ice to the laboratory and microbiological analysis was carried out within 2 hours after the collection. Susceptibility testing of bacterial strains was according to CLSI guideline at 28˚C by the disk diffusion assay.

Results: From a total of 450 samples, (226 chickens and 224 beef meats), 70 (15.5%) samples were positive for Yersinia spp. Of these isolates, (80%) 56 species were identified as Y. enterocolitica, 8 (11%) as Y. frederiksenii, 5 (7%) as Y. intermedia and 1 (1.4%) as Y. kristensenii. The highest rate of resistance was seen against cephalotin (98%), and ampicillin (52%). However, gentamicin and chloramphenicol were the most active antibiotics against the target cultures. Considering the season of isolation, Yersinia spp. were frequently isolated in autumn (52%), followed by spring (29%).

Conclusions: Y. enterocolitica was the most spp. distributed among other species. Many factors, such as isolation assay, season, and geographical location play critical role in reports of increase or decrease in the prevalence of the Yersinia spp. all over the world. Our findings demonstrate that the isolation ratio of Y. enterocolitica and other species is higher in colder regions. Most of the isolates were resistant to first generation cephalosporins (cephalothin). The most active antimicrobial agents were choloramphenicol, aminoglycozide and sulfunamdes. Regarding to the high sensitivity of Yersinia spp. to gentamicin and chloramphenicol, these antibiotics would be the choice for the treatment of Yersinia infections.

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